I am starting up a 55 gallon brackish tank. Brackish Mono Sebae T/R-2" Monodactylus sebae.

These days, with much effort, we now have a steady supply of captive-bred, Florida-bred Mono Sebae. M. sebae is a schooling fish; in my personal experience I’ve found them to also become very aggressive and belligerent in small groups (eg. M. sebae would be far more enticing if displayed and sold in groups of juveniles allowing them to be bold and active.

What I knew from earlier reports of the breeding of M. sebae completely contradicts what we know about the breeding of pelagic-spawning marine fishes (which I would kind of consider M. sebae to be based, on the information shared with me) and also contradicts what I know of the breeding of M. argenteus and M. sebae today by fellow marine fish breeders.

The eggs are very small, and the number of the eggs can be 10000. I have one individual five year old Mono exhibiting odd behavior now? So in reality, this is a schooling fish that I believe should be kept in larger groups of perhaps half a dozen or more (and thus in large tanks) as an adult. Expand signature. Any clues about this behavior? $11.85. Mono Sebae can be mixed with several other brackish species; my top picks would be M. argenteus as well as the available Scatophagus varieties. Monodactylus argenteus has also been successfully spawned and reared in similar settings, where mass egg harvesting followed by blind rearing attempts would yield results. “Dustin [Drawdy] was critical for our success. Any clues about this behavior? In the wild, not all of their habitats overlap. Both are members of the family Monodactylidae, the Moonyfishes or Fingerfishes. Dark, stressed-out single juveniles in a holding tank aren’t inviting; and I say this having seen them exactly in this fashion several times at multiple aquarium shops. Foster has worked in conjunction with Dustin Drawdy of Oak Ridge Fish Hatcheries to close the life cycle on this challenging species, which both businesses now offer to the aquarium trade. What I knew from earlier reports of the breeding of M. sebae completely contradicts what we know about the breeding of pelagic-spawning marine fishes (which I would kind of consider M. sebae to be based, on the information shared with me) and also contradicts what I know of the breeding of M. argenteus and M. sebae today by fellow marine fish breeders. – Jonathan Foster, FishEye Aquaculture.

All three can be found in the Mangroves proper, which get inundated with sea water at high tide. Cal publication in 1970! I was wondering if I should be changing salinities during the life cycle of my fish. As a prime example, the “Columbian Sharks”, a.k.a.

Sign up to get interesting news and updates delivered to your inbox. It wound up being that the late larval / early juvenile phase was the biggest hurdle to overcome for the consistent rearing of this species. Of course, there are some brackish species erroneously passed off by the aquarium trade as freshwater species, thus destined for improper husbandry at the hands of uninformed aquarists. A young captive-bred Mono Sebae, ready for retail sale. Wasn't sure if they would just stress one another, so I only got one, but it seems bored staying primarily in … Friday Photospread - Artificial Incubation of Freshwater Angelfish Eggs, Part 1, WARNING: Bloodworm Allergies Are Real for Some Fishkeepers, AMAZONAS Videos: Bettas in the Wild - What They Tell Us About Minimum Tank Sizes for Bettas, Unboxed and Reviewed - Deep Blue Professional Betta Aquariums. A dazzling species that defied easy culture, “We’re not sure if we’ve raised a million just yet, but we’ve definitely killed a million.” The related Monodactylus argenteus, the Silver Mono, is much more commonly seen, which makes sense given its wide Indo-Pacific range, whereas M. sebae is native to Africa’s west coast (the Atlantic side). The Datnoid Guy .circa 2001. Salinity in these places is low. The two other Monodactylus species seem completely absent in the aquarium trade, as are the two related Pomfreds / Pomfrets of the genus Schuettea. It wasn’t until this month that University of Florida’s Tropical Aquaculture Lab produced the undeniable proof that they had bred the species in captivity, and ironically, the methods claimed by earlier ‘successes’ failed to produce results.

Jonathan Foster of FishEye Aquaculture is the breeder responsible for making captive-bred M. sebae to reality.

Most recently, there was the claim by researchers that they had succeeded...great...except the offered no proof; their documentation ended at 26 days post hatch.

Thinking of brackish water fishes conjures only a handful of occasionally-available fish species including some of the various Puffers, Gobies, Scats and Monos. “We can raise them in saltwater environment, but moving them to the ponds at an early age was a huge advantage for yields, and this allowed for the fish to be available at a cheaper price than it has ever been offered before,” says Foster. It is not unheard of to read about M. sebae reaching a foot (12″) or more in height. It is the English-language publisher of CORAL Magazine and is based in Shelburne, Vermont, USA. The past reputation for M. sebae being disease prone is certainly off putting, but that’s a thing of the past with captive-bred fish produced right here in the US. I'm pretty sure Bob Allen was the first to spawn these years ago. Biotope: Inhabits mainly estuaries and mangroves, rarely enters lagoons and freshwater. With these figures in mind, most recommendations for Mono aquariums are big; 125 gallons to 250 gallons or more. Just a note to say how much a appreciate all of this info. Earlier this year I spoke with Foster to get the back story on this accomplishment. Large scale farm customers were concerned about the loss of Angelfish as an offering, and a request went out for an alternative. Home | Freshwater Semi Aggressive | Brackish Mono Sebae T/R-4" Monodactylus sebae. 3 or less). The brackish water offerings at most aquarium shops, if they even bother to carry brackish fish at all, are often relegated to a single tank. This last statement may seem like a pretty strong allegation to make about something that occurred in 1970, but to have some perspective, even clownfishes hadn’t been successfully spawned and reared by that point in time! an incredible example of a brackish community, First Captive Breeding of the "Freshwater" Top Hat Blenny. M. sebae reaches about 8″ in length at the most, but most people talk about this species in terms of height, rather than length. The prolarva of Monodactylus sebae, 12 hours post hatch. It however spends much of it’s time tilted slightly tail down and nose upward and wiggling quickly back and forth in one spot for lengthy periods of time. (That said, the Eastern or Ladder-finned Pomfred is quite the looker!). All three can be found in the Mangroves proper, which get inundated with sea water at high tide. Monodactylus sebae egg, 16 hours post spawn. Item# BRACKISH-MONO-SEBAE-T-R-15-INCH. Most recently, there was the claim by researchers that they had succeeded…great…except the offered no proof; their documentation ended at 26 days post hatch. “Silvertip Sharks” or “Blackfin Sharks” are neither freshwater fishes nor sharks; best known as Ariopsis seemanni, they’re a marine catfish species too often suggested as being freshwater, yet most decidedly are brackish fish that as adults are suggested to be best in full strength saltwater.