All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. Laestrygones, also spelled Laestrygonians or Lestrygonians, fictional race of cannibalistic giants described in Book 10 of Homer’s Odyssey. Our editors will review what you’ve submitted and determine whether to revise the article.

man-eating giants encountered by Odysseus. 2. Odysseus sent some scouts out to see what kind of peoples lived there. Having made their way to this house, they were received by the ruler's wife, a huge and terrifying woman, who immediately went to the market place to call her husband. Lit. References in classic literature ? Fleet still intact. The two sailors and the messenger, whom Odysseus sent, found first a track that had been used by wagons to bring timber down from the mountains to the Laestrygonian settlements, and then they came to a spring called Artacie, where they happened to meet the daughter of the Laestrygonian chief Antiphates 2, who being asked for the ruler of the country pointed at once to her father's house. The Epic City: Urbanism, Utopia, and the Garden in Ancient Greece and Rome, The Social Archaeology of Australian Indigenous Societies, Ladyzhin State Regional Electric Power Plant, Lafayette, Marie Joseph Paul Yves Roch Gilbert du Motier, marquis de.

Allusions can be direct or indirect, meaning that they might explicitly state the name of the thing they're referring to, or they might hint at it in other, subtler ways. Odysseus then, seeing that hope was only in a hasty escape, cut the hawser of his ship, and having ordered the crew to dash in with the oars, came out to the open sea, leaving behind the cliffs and the massacre that agitated the otherwise calm waters. The Laestrygonians, a race of giant cannibals, are one of the many challenges Odysseus faces on his odyssey. Corrections?

They are best known for having destroyed Odysseus' fleet.

https://encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/Laestrygonians. Allusions to other works of literature are often harder to identify and understand than allusions to events or people, since they require a reader to have familiarity with the text being referenced. 2 : the act of making an indirect reference to something : the act of alluding to something. One of this two was Macareus 2, an Ithacan in Odysseus' crew, who was later among those whom Circe turned into pigs. And instead of fair wind they had wearisome rowing for six days and nights. Odysseus and his men came upon the Laesrygonian city of Telepylus. Laestrygones, also spelled Laestrygonians or Lestrygonians, fictional race of cannibalistic giants described in Book 10 of Homer’s Odyssey.

Odysseus, the main character of Homer's Odyssey, visited them during his journey back home to Ithaca.The giants ate many of Odysseus' men and destroyed eleven of his twelve ships by launching rocks from high cliffs. What does Laestrygonians mean? When Odysseus and his men land on the island native to the Laestrygones, the giants pelt Odysseus’s ships with boulders, sinking all but Odysseus’s own ship. Definition of Laestrygonians in the Definitions.net dictionary. He is the same who much later met Aeneas, having stayed behind in the course of Odysseus. Lestrygonians are cannibals who destroy all of Odysseus' ships except his own and kill the crews.

Definition of allusion. He then climbed the headland in order to get a view from the top, and having caught sight of a wisp of smoke rising up from the countryside, he sent three of his men in order to find out about the inhabitants. When Odysseus and his men land on the island native to the Laestrygones, the giants pelt Odysseus’s ships with boulders, sinking all but Odysseus’s own ship. Antiphates and his unnamed queen made those scouts into dinner.

Apd.Ep.7.12; Hom.Od.10.82ff., 23.318; Hyg.Fab.125; Ov.Met.14.233; Strab.1.2.9. In this land nightfall and morning are so close to each other that shepherds bringing in their flocks at night are met by other shepherds driving out their flocks at dawn. [Gk. Thence the Laestrygonians began pelting the fleet with huge rocks, and harpooning the men, whom they carried off to make their meals.