It’s a fascinating look at how cinema has evolved historically from its theatrical roots – an interval with ice cream and an organ singalong make Vue and IMAX seem comparatively boring – to the more casual event it’s subsequently developed into. Smith not only cuts together footage from films of people at the cinema, but he also includes footage of what they are watching. Indeed, the film ultimately feels very much like a tribute to the experience of going to the cinema and watching films. It’s a surprisingly simple idea, well executed and very evocative. From buying a ticket, to raunchy back-of-the-auditorium exploits, Smith lovingly pieces together footage that shows the evolution of a favourite pastime. There’s a romance to Have You Seen My Movie? ». Click here for more articles on Have You Seen My Movie? Marclay went further with this approach with work such as the dizzying Crossfire, or the deceptively complex Video Quartet.

consists entirely of found footage from other movies.

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Clips from 100+ films are cut together to create a new cinema-going experience. Add the first question. This scene is being ‘watched’ by Andy (Tim Robbins) and Red (Morgan Freeman) in The Shawshank Redemption. Have You Seen My Movie? It’s an unusual perspective: the lens of focus is trained keenly on how we experience cinema, and the way that event is portrayed. Keep track of everything you watch; tell your friends. display: none !important; A massive montage of movie characters going to the movies. Smith has now branched out on his own with a feature length work entitled Have You Seen My Movie?, which very much continues in this tradition of mass assemblage video works that play on one particular concept, but extend beyond simply being a ‘neat idea’. Paul Anton Smith, collaborator with Christian Marclay on The Clock, explores the intimacy of the auditorium through video excerpts ranging from major blockbusters to indie treasures. that is steeped in the joy of going to the movies. Get Movies. The more playful elements of the film are borne from extremely sharp editing, and when coupled with baby-faced actors making their screen debut, becomes an enjoyable and nostalgic encounter. Read more reviews from the festival here. Looking for some great streaming picks?

One film that plays ‘on screen’ is Habeas Corpus, the film within the film in The Player, which sees Bruce Willis rescue Julia Roberts from the gas chamber. Romance, musical, action, horror, noir, comedy - and countless characters watch in the dark with you. A woman fears for her son's health when her ex-husband kidnaps him. | Review, The Barren Author: A six-part audio comedy-drama, Ten places to have a meal before the lockdown – also al fresco, London Film Festival 2016: The Illinois Parables | Review, London Film Festival 2016: Short Film Awards. All rights reserved. is certainly a film that will play extremely well to an audience of cinema lovers. is a great deal of fun to watch. If you continue to use this site we will assume that you are happy with that. This week we review 'How It Ends', a … Clips from 100+ films are cut together to create a new cinema-going experience. Copyright © 2018 Theo Pape. This is obviously not what any of these characters are actually reacting to in their respective films, but the moment works because of the skilful editing and the effect broadens the meaning of this scene. He is surrounded by people laughing at the racist Asian character played by Mickey Rooney, but not just those in Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story, but cinema patrons pulled from many, many films. A film that reminds you of why you go to the movies in the first place. In his 1995 work Telephones, for instance, we see Michael Keaton on the phone to Tippi Hedron, divided by decades but brought together by editing in a fun and novel way. This all culminated in Marclay’s most incredible work to date, The Clock, a film which saw Marclay and his assistant, Paul Anton Smith, assemble a twenty-four hour video installation from film clips that mirrored the actual time of day. In Have You Seen My Movie?, Smith takes clips from a very wide range of films and cuts between them in order to create a macro narrative of the experience of going to the cinema and a great many micro narratives within this wonderful framework. A film that reminds you of why you go to the movies in the first place. A joyous tribute to a sadly dying shared cultural experience, and … You must be a registered user to use the IMDb rating plugin. is the ritual of movie-going, and explores it from a performative and experiential perspective. Directed by Paul Schneider.

is a deeply personal affair, and leaves you reminiscing about your own (misspent) times in a velveteen upholstered chair, at the back of … Learn how your comment data is processed. Directed by Paul Anton Smith. London Film Festival 2016: Have You Seen My Movie? And it’s the hushed congregation of movie worshippers that this film celebrates. is also a great deal of fun to watch. is awash with skilful editing, and the more you watch, you appreciate Smith’s vast knowledge and meticulous research. Romance, musical, action, horror, noir, comedy - and countless characters watch in the dark with you. As the show wraps up and the patrons begin to leave their various cinema seats, there is a sense of melancholy – helped along by ending the film with the climax of Casablanca – that overcomes you. Those familiar with The Player will know that it was Griffin Mill, as played by Robbins, who sold out the screenwriters of Habeas Corpus and allowed this terrible ending. Travel back in time to check out the early roles of some of Hollywood's heavy hitters.

Audience Reviews for Has Anybody Seen My Gal? Cinema is a shrine to ego. A careful consideration of eyelines and spatial coherence also ensures that when one character looks at another in an entirely different movie, the cut is effective and the scene carries on as if we haven’t just jumped thirty years in time.

For further information about the 60th London Film Festival visit here. A significant portion of Have You Seen My Movie? A joyous tribute to a sadly dying shared cultural experience, and a smart and entertaining conceptual movie. Have You Seen My Movie? Regardless of being a vague pastiche of Marclay’s The Clock, the Toronto native Smith manages to successfully hold his own as a creator and artist in his big screen debut, which is already on its way to prestige. If you accept this notice, your choice will be saved and the page will refresh. This is developed further as we begin to comprehend the themes of shared experiences and unique outlooks, with every audience member seeing something new. where I review movies I randomly pick on Netflix! (2016). In spite of the rather haphazard appearance, Have You Seen My Movie? is a deeply personal affair, and leaves you reminiscing about your own (misspent) times in a velveteen upholstered chair, at the back of a dark room. More fun moments can be simple gags – a sequence of characters engaging in oral sex climaxing with The Magic of Halloween from the score from E.T. Want to share IMDb's rating on your own site?

Dec 21, 2011 Charming comedy of millionaire Charles Coburn checking out family of a lost love and innocently wrecking havoc in their lives. }. Check out some of the IMDb editors' favorites movies and shows to round out your Watchlist. Learn more and then the iconic bike shot, for instance – but there are also a number that rely on a little cinematic knowledge.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. This is particularly effective in a sequence in which Smith makes significant use of the scene from Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story, in which Bruce Lee (Jason Scott Lee) watches Breakfast at Tiffany’s with his then girlfriend Linda (Lauren Holly). View production, box office, & company info. .hide-if-no-js { The piece was audacious, captivating, subtly mind-altering and a great deal of fun. This obviously breaks with what the characters are actually watching for the most part, of course, and this frequently leads to some amusing and ingenious juxtapositions. Explored in a hazy thematic chronology, we’re fed a torrent of images that blur between the glory days of the silver screen, to the comparatively duller present.